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Cleaning for Allergy and Asthma Sufferers
by: Carole Pagan
My daughter recently had a bout with asthma. The strange
thing is, she hadn't had any problems for a couple of
years. In looking at the possible triggers - She had a new
batch of puppies at her dad's. While the 2 dogs didn't seem
to bother her, the addional puppies seemed to put her over
the edge.

To make matters worse, since we hadn't had problems for a
couple of years, I had become lax in some of the cleaning
that I would have done when she had problems every year.

Once I realized what her problem was, I immediately started
cleaning for asthma. That means thoroughly vacuuming walls,
behind furniture, matresses, pillows, upholstery, screens,
and vents, and dusting every crevice- including things like
behind the tv and stereo inside the cabinet, the backs of
furniture.

I normally dust the ceiling fans and blinds, but if you
kinda skip those, you need to pay more attention if you
have any allergies or asthma in your home.

A quick carpet clean and changing air filters and furnace
filters finishes up the cleaning job.

You also want to change your hand towels everyday, just in case it's a virus triggering the response.

If you have pets, keep them clean and brushed, and their living areas cleaned. Keep pets out of the bedrooms of affected people.

The things that typically trigger asthma is actually pretty long-

House dust mites found in carpeting, mattresses, bed linens,
toys, upholstered furniture, dampness, poor ventilation,
unvented cooking, humidifiers

Animal-derived allergens from dogs, cats, rodents, and birds.

Mold found in carpeting, walls, and windows, caused by leaks, poor ventialtion, water damage, or dampness.

Nitrogen oxides produced by space heaters or gas-fueled
cooking stove, used with poor ventilation.

Wood Smoke from wood stoves or fireplaces, used with
poor ventilation, or faulty equipment causing fumes to
come back into the room.

Fumes from cleaners, aerosols- like hairsprays, perfumes
and even air fresheners, pesticides, formaldehyde found in
some older household products.

Viral respiratory infections - exposure to infected people

Endotoxins from bacteria growing in soil, humidifiers, and
other moist places.

Cockroach allergen

Tobacco smoke

Excess weight.

If there is one thing you can do to minimize allergy or
asthma suffering- it is to become a vacuuming fanatic. The
more you get into that bag, the less you have floating
around in the air. It's healthier, and you'll have less
dusting to do in the long run.


About the author:
Carole is the author of Secret Confessions of a Clean
Freak. If you Love a really clean home, but Hate cleaning
it, you'll want your own copy of the secrets. Click on the
link to get it now-http://ThinAttitude.CommonSenseLiving.com



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